As Health Deductibles Rise, Employees More Likely to File Workers’ Comp Claims: Study

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Sometimes, injured employees are afraid to file a workers’ comp claim after being injured at work because they fear the specter of retaliation by their employer.

Experts suspect that up to 10% of workplace injuries are never reported because the workers choose to have the injuries covered by their employer-sponsored health plans. Most employers may not be aware of the full extent of their workplace injuries because of this phenomenon.

But, that could change as workers are saddled with higher deductibles and out-of-pocket expenses, according to a new study.

A number of past studies have found that if the costs to workers for having their personal health insurance cover a workplace injury is less than the “cost” to them of filing a workers’ comp claim, they will opt to have their health insurance cover it instead.

Here’s what studies have found over the years:

  • A 1996 study found that workers without health insurance have an incentive to claim their medical issues are work-related even if they are not, so that workers’ compensation insurance will pay for care. The study also found that if the injury occurs at work, health insurance may deter workers from filing for workers’ comp if they feel there is a cost to filing a claim.
  • A 2007 study found that a genuine workers’ comp claim can be “costly” to file for a worker if:
    • The employer dissuades workers from filing workers’ comp claims because they fear the claims will increase their premiums.
    • The injured worker does not want to deal with the paperwork for a workers’ comp claim.
    • The individual feels there is a stigma associated with filing for workers’ comp.
  • A 2003 study of Michigan workers and their physicians found that 70% of injured workers did not file for workers’ comp, and that 36% of the non-reporting injured workers cited having health insurance as a reason they did not.

What could be ahead

The most recent study, by the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI), found that injured employees are more likely to file workers’ compensation claims when they have high-deductible group health plans.

The study found that workers with a remaining group health insurance deductible that exceeds $550 are more likely to file workers’ comp claims than if the deductible were less. As more workers find themselves staring at higher health insurance deductibles, they will properly report their workers’ comp claims to their employers.

“In years past, workers may have chosen to have a work injury covered within their group health plan,” John Ruser, WCRI president and CEO, said in a statement. “But the increasing cost of deductibles may cause them to consider having the injury covered ─ where it potentially belongs ─ in the workers’ compensation system, where there are no deductibles or copayments for the medical care they receive.”

This is likely to add about 5% more claims into the system, the WCRI found.

What you can do

There are risks to both your employee and your organization if a worker does not report their workplace injury.

Urge your workers to report any workplace injuries so that you can have them properly treated. If a worker decides to not report the claim and they have their health insurance pay for it, problems can take root and cause major issues for you later:

  • Your insurer loses the chance to direct the initial treatment to an occupational health clinic that specializes in treating workers’ compensation injuries and coordinates with the employer’s return-to-work program.
  • A delay in seeking treatment may cause a deterioration in the employee’s condition that will impede their recovery time.
  • It impedes the insurance company’s ability to investigate a claim, determine compensability and identify claims fraud.


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